Preserving eternal   
 values and increase.

Cost-Average-Effect

Unchanging rates give independence.

This is our strategy for increasing assets reliably.


Purchasing with unchanging payment rates:
The Cost-Average-Effect arises from regular purchasing with constant sums. With this method, fluctuations in value mean that the purchaser, on average, purchases their precious metals at a lower price than if they were to regularly buy the same amount at varyingly high prices. Because, automatically, less weight is bought at high prices and correspondingly more at low prices. For example: a regular precious metal purchase of 100 euros per month. The lower the price, the more weight is bought. You have spent a total of 600 euros and thereby made the following purchases:

Monthly investment

100.00 euros

100.00 euros

100.00 euros

100.00 euros

100.00 euros

100.00 euros

Price per gram

100.00 euros

50.00 euros

25.00 euros

12.50 euros

25.00 euros

50.00 euros

Purchase

1 gram

2 grams

4 grams

8 grams

4 grams

2 grams

 

Investment

600 euros

Value

1,050 euros

Profit

450 euros

6 consistent purchase rates

Different prices

Automatic more
weight per purchase at low prices

AN EXTREME EXAMPLE HAS DELIBERATELY BEEN USED TO ILLUSTRATE THE MATHEMATICAL EFFECT.
THE PURCHASE SUM ADDS UP TO 600 EUROS. 21 GRAMS WERE PURCHASED.

With a price per gram of 50 euros, the value of the metal after the 6th purchase is 1,050 euros (21 grams x 50 euros). With a total purchase price of 600 euros, the profit in this mathematical example is then 450 euros. It should be noted, however, that in the case of long-lasting price increases with little or no downward fluctuation, uniform purchase may not achieve the desired effect. Therefore, a one-time payment may be the more effective choice in the case of perspectively long upward trends.

“Gold and silver possess an inner value that is not arbitrary.
It is dependent on its scarcity and the quantity of work that is dedicated to obtaining it, and it lies in the value of the capital invested in the mines that bring it forth.”

David Ricardo, British economist